Private Charles Davies from Winnipeg, who had served in the 12 Canadian Field Ambulance, wrote the following lines which appeared in a Canadian newspaper in 1919.

SHORNCLIFFE CAMP

Folkestone, though Queen of the Southern Coast,
I'm loath to leave your grassy warren;
Those steep white cliffs that beacon like a genial host
Receding from my eyes night dim with tears.

What soothing hours and happy days so dear does memory recall;
The walk along the Leas, the leafy undercliff, and Oh, that changing sea,
When the rich red sunset sparkles on thy face,
Such are my thoughts of thee picture of grace.

Garden of England! Men of Kent!
Think of your heritage; the flowers sweet scent,
That wooded glade at Seabrook, primrose clad;
The glimpse of moving picture shore to make you glad.

Those verdant meads of Shorncliffe Plain,
Bright green as emeralds after rain.
Deep down in mist of blue lies sleeping Sandgate town,
Whose twinkling lights shine like some fairy's crown.

St. Martin's spire, neath which brave Plimsol sleeps,
Whose noble work the British sailor reaps;
The bugle blasts and all war's grim array,
Much as it did in Moore's fair distant day.

Not even the mists of Passchendaele and its blood strewn duckboard track
Can blot from out my memory the charm of Radnor Park,
Who would not fight for thee, dear land,
For every flower and Kentish maid's fair hand.

Who cares for the muddy trenches and the shrapnel's piercing scream,
The waves of poison and all the ghastly scene?
There are those away in the Golden West dearer than Nelson's name-
Mothers and wives and sisters; it's for them we play the game.

Taken from Coast of Conflict by Michael & Martin  George
Folkestone has had a military presence for many years.  In fact, Shorncliffe Camp has been there since 1794, and garrisons manned the Martello Towers before that.  During both world wars, troops were stationed at Shorncliffe before being shipped to the front, and today it is still in constant use.

Not so the School of Musketry in Hythe which became the Small Arms School, and has now been demolished.  Luckily, many photos are in existence of the latter, and I too have a few, so without further ado, let's take a look.
Canadian troops camped out on St. Martin's Plain, Shorncliffe Camp.
Shorncliffe again, this time we have a Church Parade.
Still up there, this time we can see Ross Barracks.
This blurred picture dates from 1913, and it says R.A.M.C. and A.S.C. Camp, Folkestone.  Does anyone know what those acronyms stand for?
You can see photos of the School of Musketry on the Hythe page, but thought some should be here too.  It was located on Military Road, Hythe and was a lot older than this photograph!
Same entrance, and I would guess it to be around the same time frame.
Here are the barracks belonging to the School of Musketry - also now demolished.  They were located around the corner from the School on Barrack Hill.
Back to Shorncliffe Camp and those tents.  This photo was taken in 1913, just before the first world war.
A military parade in Cheriton Place in 1920.  Not a huge turnout for it was there?
Folkestone was home to several rest camps during the first world war.  Possibly during the second too, but I don't have any photos from then.

The rest camps were usually in former hotels or large homes and were used to give the fighting men a break from the conflict.

This one was entitled 'Cookhouse #3 Rest camp' in 1919.
This was taken the same year, and was of the same rest camp, so I guess the photographer just walked around the front and took the picture from Sandgate Road.
This was obviously the most popular rest camp to photograph because here is the same one taken a year earlier in 1918.  This time it was taken showing the Clifton Gardens entrance.
Here we are back to Shorncliffe Camp again.  This time we are showing you Ross Barracks again.  In this picture, they  look just like council houses don't they?  At first glance I thought I was looking at Canada Close in Cheriton.
Now this is impressive isn't it?  They were the Royald Field Artillery at Shorncliffe Camp prior to WW1.
The only name I have for this is Shorncliffe.  But I am sure someone out there knows the name of the building.  Peter Hogben tells me this is the camp gymnasium!
Now I would have pegged this one as the Boy's Brigade in the 50's, but no - would you believe it is Shorncliffe Camp again, and it dates from 1907?
This one looks more like its real age.  It is in fact a year younger than the one above, and dates from 1908.
We really are in the 50's now.  Shorncliffe military cemetery.  The soldier bottom right almost didn't get into the picture did he?  And what is with the jaunty helmet?  Were they allowed to wear them like that?
Note the Martello tower up on the hill.  There are several of them on military property, so of course, the public has no access to them.  However, if this is the one on Hospital Hill, I was told it is now a house.
Dipping back in time to 1890, we see some soldiers coming along Military Road from Shorncliffe Camp.  At least that is what the card says, but Alan Taylor tells me that it is in fact Risborough Lane.
Another photo of the School of Musketry in Hythe.
The same place in 1910  However, this time we are privileged to see the buildings on the inside of the gates.
I am a little confused about this one and the next.  The building clearly has Y.M.C.A. (Young Men's Christian Association) on the side, but I have no other information on it.
This is entitled 'Y.M.C.A. No.3 Rest Camp'.  So did the Y.M.C.A. organise rest camps for the troops?  This No.3 camp looks very different to the No.3 above doesn't it?
Here we have the High Street in Hythe with some soldiers marching along in front of the Guildhall.  I wonder if they were from the School of Musketry, or had walked all the way down the hill from Shorncliffe Camp?

There are firing ranges all along the seafront in Hythe which are still in use today.  Possibly these men were coming from there.

When I lived on Pennypot Estate, the rat-a-tat of guns was a common sound.
I don't have a date for this one, which is a shame.  But here are four mounted military men at Shorncliffe Camp.
Now here is a strange photo, and I am sure someone can tell me what it is all about.  These people are all standing on top of a WW1 tank - was it the one which stood up on the Durlocks for many years?

Is it a royal visit?  I would imagine the man with the chain around his neck was the Mayor of the day.  Is the man with the cane George V1, and would that be Elizabeth, the Queen Mother (before she became  mother to a queen) on the right?
So far, I have shown you military photos mainly from the first world war era.  However, Folkestone was very badly hit during the 1939-1945 war.  It was targeted partially because of Shorncliffe Camp, they also aimed for the railway stations, the gasworks and the airfield at Hawkinge.  Plus, it was often the last piece of land before the Germans  left the British shores to go home, so unloaded their bombs as a farewell present.  A great many civilians died, and it took years and years to rebuild.  I can remember a lot of destruction still in place during my childhood in the 50's, and bombs were still being found unexploded.
Before we take a trip to the second World War, please check out this web page that I found on the devastation wreaked upon Tontine Street  and other areas in 1917.  Having lived in Tontine Street myself, it moved me deeply.  I noticed that among the list of the dead there was a couple by the name of Beer, which was my grandmother's maiden name.  I wonder if they were related to me.
Click here:
The next few photographs, along with the captions are taken from the wonderful book 'Target Folkestone' by Roy Humphries, because they did not of course make postcards of the devastation that was Folkestone during both wars.  I highly recommend this book.  It covers all aspects of the 39-45 war, and how it affected the residents of Folkestone, and also has a roll of honour to those civilians who died.  The ISBN is 0948193514 published by Meresborough Books in 1990.
All that remained of the Stuka dive-bomber which was shot down on 15th August 1940 whilst attempting to attack RAF Hawkinge.  The Ju87B of 10/LG1 struck the high tension wires at Shorncliffe Road and spun into 82-83 Shorncliffe Crescent.  Both German airmen were later buried at Folkestone New Cemetary, Hawkinge, where they remain to this day.
                        Imperial War Museum
In nearly every incident there are stories of remarkable escapes and frequently one heard that well worn cliché "There But For The Grace Of God, Go I".  But here at 30 Morrison Road, luck had run out for 59 year old Grace Taylor and her 28 year old daughter Freda Cox, when a Junkers 88 bomber attempted to strike at the nearby railway tracks, on 6th October, 1940.
Folkestone Library
The night of 18th November 1940 saw the heaviest casualties in the town when a parachute mine exploded on Beach Street, shortly after 4 a.m.  In all, 14 people were killed and 60 injured.  Fifty-six shops and houses were either demolished or partially demolished and more than 800 damaged, with a further 700 seriously affected.  So widespread was the damage that much of the area was never rebuilt.
The Mayor, Alderman George A. Gurr had said during a council debate on whether to supply beds for people using air raid shelters "...the council were considering arrangements to put up 1,000 beds or bunks and possibly one of the large hotels would be used.  Personally..." he went on, and now in his third year of office, "...I think it best to stay home in bed!..."  The parachute mine, which drifted slowly onto Morehall Avenue in the early hours 29th May 1941, caused 13 fatalities out of a total of 56 casualties, the Mayor and his wife among them.  Over 600 dwellings were damaged.
Folkestone Library
Inspecting the damage in George Lane soon after the town's heaviest shell bombardment on 13th June 1944.  The Central Cinema entrance is on the extreme right of the picture and Mr. Pink's Stores is in the centre.  88-year-old Mr. Pink was the oldest shopkeeper in the town and the shell-scarred shop was looted by people who took flags and bunting on display for the King's visit in October.
This is just a taste of Roy Humphrey's fascinating book, and if you can find it, I highly recommend you buy it.
This is a photograph that I used to have on my office wall.  It was this tank that I was referring to in the picture further up the page.  The tank dates from the first world war, and it seems to me I remember it being up there.  I had an e-mail from Graham Skinner in 2007 telling me that his father, who had died the previous year at age 82 was one of the children, I have picked him out with an arrow.  At the time he was living at 32 North Street - the garden of which backed onto "The Bank" as they called that part of the Durlocks.  He would have attended St Peters School at the time.

When his mother went into service, his father being dead, he was brought up by the Care family who lived in the house at the bottom of the Durlocks - the one that was built over the alley that still runs alongside the (now defunct) harbour railway.

Home
Don't forget - if any photos remain blank after the page has loaded, right click your mouse into the space, and left click 'Show Picture'.
The BBC also did an excellent series called 'The People's War, and featured stories from the general public who experienced what it was like to live through the war.  If you would like to read the articles, click on this link:  http://www.bbc.co.uk/history/ww2peopleswar/categories/
Alistair Duncan, who sent me some photos of his own below, answered these questions for me:

RAMC   = Royal Army Medical Corps
ASC     = Army Service Corps

Thanks Alistair! :-)
Alan Taylor came up with the answer to this one, and it is not royalty at all.  Here is what he says:
This photo is of the official reception on 29th July, 1919.  The tank was presented to Folkestone by Major General Sir E. D. Swinton K.C.B.  The Mayor is Sir Stephen Penfold, next to him is Sir Philip Sassoon M.P. and next to him Major General Swinton.  At the back is Town Sergeant Mr. E. Chadwick and behind the Mayor is Alderman George Spurgen.
I was confused why Belgian soldiers were leaving for the front from Folkestone on their bicycles, but Alan Taylor had the answer to this one too.  He told me that The Belgian Cycle Corps landed at Folkestone from Dieppe to Folkestone. They had fought the Germans at Namurate and had become detached from their main unit. Within 24 hours of arriving, they made arrangements to go back to continue fighting.  Thanks Alan!

This photo doesn't look that old, but it shows the married Men's Quarters at Shorncliffe Camp in 1903
Here the military men stationed at Sandgate had to share their field with a lot of sheep in 1905
Shorncliffe Barracks again in 1904
A 1903 photograph of Shorncliffe Hospital.  There was a remarkable amount of colour photography around in these early days wasn't there?  Yet move up to the 60's and you rarely see any in colour.  Very strange!
This could be a detachment from D-Squadron, Royal East Kent Yeomanry Mounted Rifles (Hussars) at Shorncliffe Camp, c1908.  I wouldn't like to swear to it though.
This was sent to me by Chris Long, who says the following"   
"This was given to my father Horace by his father Alfred after the great war, He has told me it was given to all the folkestone lads who served in the 1st 2 3 4 or 5th Folkestone battalion at the end of the war 1918 by the Folkestone council. I dont know why or if indeed it was ever sung, Maybe someone out there knows"
Here we have Moore Barracks and Napier Barracks at Shorncliffe Camp
The Royal Welsh Fusiliers at Shorncliffe
Alan Taylor sent me this photograph of a Military Tournament taking place at the Pleasure Gardens in 1905.  You can see the Pleasure Gardens Theatre in the background.  That ball looks as if it might be made of metal doesn't it?  What they were doing with it is anybody's guess!
In the background here, you can see Somerset Barracks, again at Shorncliffe.
I guess this card was designed to help Folkestonians rest easier in their beds at night.
There was a beautiful bed of flowers on The Leas in 1956.  It commemorated the Victoria Cross, naming five recipients of it. 
William Reginald Cotter (March 1883 - March 14, 1916) was an English recipient of the Victoria Cross, the highest and most prestigious award for gallantry in the face of the enemy that can be awarded to British and Commonwealth forces.

He was 33 years old, and an Acting Corporal in the 6th Battalion, The Buffs (East Kent Regiment), British Army during the First World War when the following deed took place for which he was awarded the VC.

On 6 March 1916 near Hohenzollern Redoubt, France, Corporal Cotter's leg was blown off at the knee and he was also wounded in both arms. He nevertheless made his way unaided for 50 yards to a crater, steadied the men who were holding it, controlled their fire, issued orders and altered their dispositions to meet a fresh counter-attack. For two hours he held his position and only allowed his wounds to be roughly dressed when the attack had quietened down. He could not be moved back for 14 hours and during all this time he had a cheery word for everyone.

Grave/memorial at Lillers Communal Cemetery, France. 7m NW of Bethune. Plot IV. Row E. Grave 45. Headstone.

His Victoria Cross is displayed at the The Buffs Regimental Museum (Canterbury, Kent).
Two photos of Folkestone's War Memorial.  I would guess the top one is the most recent, judging by the amount of foliage that has grown behind it.
This photo and the two below were sent to me by Alistair Duncan who was stationed at Shorncliffe with the Infantry Junior Leaders Battalion (IJLB) in 1975/76 and again in 1981/83 as a Cpl instructor.  Alistair is in the front row, 9th from the left.
Alistair is easy to pick out of this group.  He is the only one in dress uniform.
IJLB Marching around Folkestone
Lee Podgson, who has also sent me some fabulous recent photos of the harbour buildings, sent me this one of a WW2 bunker on the East Cliff.  Did you know it was there?  I didn't!
I believe Lee took this one on the same day, they are WW2 aircraft on display at Capel-le-Ferne
If you have your own memories of Folkestone during the war, or military memories at Shorncliffe be sure to share them with us by jotting them down in the guest book below
This page updated March 8th, 2012
This was the Fat House at No. 3 Rest Camp.  Why was it so called I ask?  Was it the cookhouse?  Did they render down fat here or something?
Back to earlier photos of Shorncliffe Camp.  There is Calvary training taking place on the left, and the soldiers on the right are WW1 era.
This is the first ship I have shown you on this page.  But the Folkestone ferries were kept very busy during wartime taking troops and supplies back and forth across the Channel. This one is the SS Biarritz during WW2 in her Dazzle camouflage.  She was built in 1915 and went out of service in 1948.  Her sister ship the Maid of Orleans, which was built in 1918 was lost during the D Day landings in June 1944, but the Biarritz saw the remainder of her distinguished career trooping with the Ministry of Transport.  This  photo was sent to me by Chris Wood, who scanned it from a book called 'British Cross Channel Railway Passenger Ships by John de S. Winser - 1994.
This photo of Risborough Lines, Shorncliffe Camp was sent to me by Lisa & Tony of Folkestone.
I was trying to buy this one, but was outbid by Stephen Ratcliffe of Folkestone, who was kind enough to send me a scan - just as good and twice as cheap! :-)    The card, dated 1916, was entitled Soldiers Institute, Shorncliffe Camp, which I assume is the building on the hill, because if I am not mistaken, the one at the bottom is Horn Street school.  I am curious about the buildings on the right, would they have been stables belonging to the house you can see far right?  The card was sent from a soldier to his girlfriend.  Did he return after the war?  Did they marry?  We will never know.
This beautiful modern view of the Warren was another sent to me by Lee Podgson.  Why is it on the Military page?  Because if you look to the bottom, you will see he was standing on the WW2 bunker that is still up on the East Cliff.
These two photos of the Military Cemetery at Shorncliffe Camp were sent to me by Peter.  Those graves on the left look pretty old don't they?  Thanks Peter! :-)
"When i was  a child I was machine gunned by a German plane whilst playing in  the road (Church Rd Cheriton).  Missed me but apparently one girl was killed. 

The Author Roy Humphreys who wrote the books about the war in this area lives near  me,  and has a lot of records of that time.  
He tells me the incident is logged, but without detail.   Pity,  because  my memory of the event is hazy.   Would love to know it my memory of one killed is correct."
Peter Hogben of Hawkinge wrote to following to me.  Does anyone else remember this incident?
Roll of Honour
An incomplete list of Folkestone civilians killed as a result of enemy action during WW11
An incomplete list of casualties of the Great Folkestone air raid on Friday, May 25th 1917
" None of us could have predicted our fate when in the second week ofJune 1917, our small group walked up a narrow gangway and was packed together on an old paddle steamer.  As the men crowded on board, the group that I was with moved to stand by the port side paddle  As we pulled out of Folkestone harbour we watched England and the white cliffs gradually recede into the darkness. I was not the only one who wondered whether we would ever set foot on her soil again"
Harry Patch, the last fighting tommy.
Harry did come home and lived to 109 years old
Sent to me by Tom Compton, who is searching for a photo of their ship, St. Cecelia.  Can anyone help?
You will find Jack Anderson on the People page
ARNOLD, May Alexandra, age 21, died 25th May 1917
BANKS, Harold Hayward, age 25, died 26th May 1917
BARKER, Eliza Mary, age 24 or 34, died 25th May 1917
BEER, Annie, age 28, died 25th May 1917
BEER, Annie, age 2, died 25th May 1917
BEER, Arthur Stephen, age 11, died 25th May 1917
BLOODWORTH, George Henry, age 26, died 25th May 1917
BOWBRICK, Gertrude Elizabeth, age 12, died 25th May 1917
BOWBRICK, Lily Caroline (Nellie), age 55, died 24th March 1925
BOWBRICK, Mabel Esther, age 9, died 25th May 1917
BROCKWAY, Sidney, age 63, died 25th May 1917
BURGIN, Dorothy Lillian, age 16, died 31st May 1917
BURKE, David John, age 42, died 25th May 1917
BURVILL, Hilda Elizabeth, age 20, died 26th May 1917
BUTCHER, George Edward, age 44, died 6th June 1917
CASON, Annie Elizabeth, age 46, died 25th May 1917
CASTLE, Albert Edward, age 41, died 25th May 1917
CHAPMAN, Kathleen, age 16, died 25th May 1917
CLARK, William, age 12, died ----- 1917
CONSIDINE, Francis Henry, age 5, died ----- 1917
COOPER, Phyllis Amies, age 10, died 26th May 1917
DANIELS, Albert Dennis, age 12, died 25th May 1917
DAY, Frederick, age 52, died 25th May 1917
DICKER, Edith Agnes, age 13, died 25th May 1917
DOWN, Alfred Durrett, age 54, died -----
DUKES, Florence Edith, age 18, died 25th May 1917
DUKES, Florence Elizabeth, age 51, died 25th May 1917
EALES, Edith May, age 18, died 26th May 1917
FEIST, Nellie, age 50, died 25th May 1917
FEIST, Stanley Albert, age 5, died 25th May 1917
FRANCIS, Florence, age 33, died 25th May 1917
GOULD, Edward or Ernest Stephen, age 40, died 25th May 1917
GRAVES, Richard Ashby, age 40, died 25th May 1917
GRIMES, Edith Mary, age 24, died 25th May 1917
HALL, William Henry, age --, died 27th May 1917
HAMBLEY, Johannah Mary, age 67, died 25th May, 1917
HAMBROOK, Ethel, age 12, died --------
HARRIS, Caroline, age 35, died 25th May 1917
HARRISON, Fanny or Annie, age 39, died 25th May 1917
HAYES, Dennis William, age 2 yrs 9 mths, died -------
HAYES, Martha Godden, age 30, died 25th May 1917
HAYWARD, Louisa Alice, age 37, died 25th May 1917
HICKMAN, Arthur David, age 5, died 25th May 1917
HOLLOWAY, Mary Philhemina, age 9, died 25th May 1917
HOLLOWAY, Veronica, age 1 yr 3 mths, died 25th May 1917
HORN, Edward, age 43, died 25th May 1917
HOUDART, Constant, age 33, died 25th May 1917
HUGHES, Rose, age 34, died -------
JACKMAN, Dorothy Bertha, age 14, died 25th May 1917
JENNER, Oron Alfred, age 26, died 25th May 1917
LAXTON, Katherine Euphemia, age 72, died -------
LEE, William, age -----, died ------
LYTH, Daniel Stringer, age 52, died 25th May 1917
MARCHMENT, Jane, age 31, died 25th May 1917
MAXTED, Elizabeth, age 31, died 25th May 1917
McDONALD, Agnes Curren, age 22, died 1st June 1917
McDONALD, Albert Edward Charles, age 11, died 25th May 1917
McGUIRE, Ernest Henry, age 6, died 25th May 1917
MOSS, Jane Charlotte, age 20, died 25th May 1917
MOSS, Walter George, age 2 mths, died 25th May 1917
NORRIS, Florence Kathleen, age 2, died 25th May 1917
NORRIS, Florence Louise, age 24, died 25th May 1917
NORRIS, Willian Alfred John, age 10 mths, died 25th May 1917
REED, Mabel, age 12, died 25th May 1917
ROBINSON, John Walter Francis, age 6, died 25th May 1017
RUMSEY, Florence (Florrie), age 17, died 26th May 1917
STOKES, Arthur Ernest, age 14, died 28th May 1917
STOKES, William Henry, age 46, died 25th May 1917
TERRY, Edith Gwendoline, (Gwennie), age 14, died 25th May 1917
VANE, Alfred, age 36, died 25th May 1917
VERSCHUEREN, Hyppolite, age 41, died 25th May 1917
WALTON, Doris Eileen Spencer, age 16, died 25th May 1917
WAUGH, Elizabeth Charlotte, age 48, died 25th May 1917
WILSON, Isabelle, age 80, died 25th May 1917

ARNOLD, May Alexandra, age 21, died 25th May 1917
BANKS, Harold Hayward, age 25, died 26th May 1917
BARKER, Eliza Mary, age 24 or 34, died 25th May 1917
BEER, Annie, age 28, died 25th May 1917
BEER, Annie, age 2, died 25th May 1917
BEER, Arthur Stephen, age 11, died 25th May 1917
BLOODWORTH, George Henry, age 26, died 25th May 1917
BOWBRICK, Gertrude Elizabeth, age 12, died 25th May 1917
BOWBRICK, Lily Caroline (Nellie), age 55, died 24th March 1925
BOWBRICK, Mabel Esther, age 9, died 25th May 1917
BROCKWAY, Sidney, age 63, died 25th May 1917
BURGIN, Dorothy Lillian, age 16, died 31st May 1917
BURKE, David John, age 42, died 25th May 1917
BURVILL, Hilda Elizabeth, age 20, died 26th May 1917
BUTCHER, George Edward, age 44, died 6th June 1917
CASON, Annie Elizabeth, age 46, died 25th May 1917
CASTLE, Albert Edward, age 41, died 25th May 1917
CHAPMAN, Kathleen, age 16, died 25th May 1917
CLARK, William, age 12, died ----- 1917
CONSIDINE, Francis Henry, age 5, died ----- 1917
COOPER, Phyllis Amies, age 10, died 26th May 1917
DANIELS, Albert Dennis, age 12, died 25th May 1917
DAY, Frederick, age 52, died 25th May 1917
DICKER, Edith Agnes, age 13, died 25th May 1917
DOWN, Alfred Durrett, age 54, died -----
DUKES, Florence Edith, age 18, died 25th May 1917
DUKES, Florence Elizabeth, age 51, died 25th May 1917
EALES, Edith May, age 18, died 26th May 1917
FEIST, Nellie, age 50, died 25th May 1917
FEIST, Stanley Albert, age 5, died 25th May 1917
FRANCIS, Florence, age 33, died 25th May 1917
GOULD, Edward or Ernest Stephen, age 40, died 25th May 1917
GRAVES, Richard Ashby, age 40, died 25th May 1917
GRIMES, Edith Mary, age 24, died 25th May 1917
HALL, William Henry, age --, died 27th May 1917
HAMBLEY, Johannah Mary, age 67, died 25th May, 1917
HAMBROOK, Ethel, age 12, died --------
HARRIS, Caroline, age 35, died 25th May 1917
HARRISON, Fanny or Annie, age 39, died 25th May 1917
HAYES, Dennis William, age 2 yrs 9 mths, died -------
HAYES, Martha Godden, age 30, died 25th May 1917
HAYWARD, Louisa Alice, age 37, died 25th May 1917
HICKMAN, Arthur David, age 5, died 25th May 1917
HOLLOWAY, Mary Philhemina, age 9, died 25th May 1917
HOLLOWAY, Veronica, age 1 yr 3 mths, died 25th May 1917
HORN, Edward, age 43, died 25th May 1917
HOUDART, Constant, age 33, died 25th May 1917
HUGHES, Rose, age 34, died -------
JACKMAN, Dorothy Bertha, age 14, died 25th May 1917
JENNER, Oron Alfred, age 26, died 25th May 1917
LAXTON, Katherine Euphemia, age 72, died -------
LEE, William, age -----, died ------
LYTH, Daniel Stringer, age 52, died 25th May 1917
MARCHMENT, Jane, age 31, died 25th May 1917
MAXTED, Elizabeth, age 31, died 25th May 1917
McDONALD, Agnes Curren, age 22, died 1st June 1917
McDONALD, Albert Edward Charles, age 11, died 25th May 1917
McGUIRE, Ernest Henry, age 6, died 25th May 1917
MOSS, Jane Charlotte, age 20, died 25th May 1917
MOSS, Walter George, age 2 mths, died 25th May 1917
NORRIS, Florence Kathleen, age 2, died 25th May 1917
NORRIS, Florence Louise, age 24, died 25th May 1917
NORRIS, Willian Alfred John, age 10 mths, died 25th May 1917
REED, Mabel, age 12, died 25th May 1917
ROBINSON, John Walter Francis, age 6, died 25th May 1017
RUMSEY, Florence (Florrie), age 17, died 26th May 1917
STOKES, Arthur Ernest, age 14, died 28th May 1917
STOKES, William Henry, age 46, died 25th May 1917
TERRY, Edith Gwendoline, (Gwennie), age 14, died 25th May 1917
VANE, Alfred, age 36, died 25th May 1917
VERSCHUEREN, Hyppolite, age 41, died 25th May 1917
WALTON, Doris Eileen Spencer, age 16, died 25th May 1917
WAUGH, Elizabeth Charlotte, age 48, died 25th May 1917
WILSON, Isabelle, age 80, died 25th May 1917

AIANO, Gladys Lillian, age 47, died 18th November 1940
ANSELL, Vera Emily Myrtle, age 47, died 17th May 1942
ARCHARD, Edith, age 56, died 29th May 1941
ARCHARD, Herbert Benjamin, age 63, died 29th May 1941
ATKINS, Alfred Benjamin, age 12, died 11th August 1944
BAILEY, Alice Emma, age 45, died 18th November 1940
BAILEY, Ellen, age 73, died 18th November 1940
BAILEY, Frederick, age 61, died 20th March 1941
BAKER, William, age 17, died 9th November 1942
BAKER, William Charles, age 32, died 13th November 1940
BEAL, John, age 81, died 3rd August 1944
BENTLEY, Diana, age 10, died 6th October 1940
BISHOP, Hilary, age 49, died 26th August 1940
BOSS, John Poultney, age 52, died 24th April 1942
BURVILL, James Robert, age 53, died 3rd July 1944
BUSH, Alfred Edward, age 57, died 14th September 1944
BUSHELL, Dorothy Mary, age 16, died 6th October 1940
COHEN, Gertrude, age 42, died 10th December 1942
COLEGATE, Alfred, age 68, died 19th November 1940
COLEGATE, Sophia, age 77, died 18th November 1940
COOPER, Frederick, age 37, died 23rd September 1942
CORNISH, Richard, age 66, died 4th January 1940
CRAUFORF-STUART, Kennedy, Lt.Col., age --, died 21st Aug.1942
CRUMP, Daisy, age 49, died 29th May 1941
COX, Freda Kathleen, age 28, died 6th October 1940
DICKINSON, William George, age 49, died 15th September 1944
EARLY, Ronald Leslie, age 20, died 18th November 1940
EDWARDS, Walter Victor, age 55, died 4th November 1942
ELLIOTT, Vivienne, age 10 weeks, died 14th September 1944
FISHER, John, age 53, died 15th August 1942
FITZGERALD, Edward Desmond, age --, died 27th October 1940
FITZGERALD, Louisa Marion, age 70, died 27th October 1940
FOAD, William, age 48, died 4th January 1940
FOREMAN, Arthur John Earle, age 18, died 11th October 1940
GARDNER, William John, age 29, died 5th October 1940
GRIFFIN, Alice, age 29, died 19th March 1941
GRIFFIN, John Patrick, age 4, died 19th March 1941
GRINNIN, Peter William, age 18 months, died 19th March 1941
GURR, George Albert, age 59, JP, died 29th May 1941
GURR, Kate Matilda Jane, age 60, died 29th May 1941
HAMMON, Roger Sidney, age 17, died 21st August 1942
HART, Edward Richard, age 35, died 5th October 1940
HART, Louise Marsh, age 17, died 26th August 1940
HASTINGS, William Charles, age --, died 9th August 1945
HOLLAWAY, Charles Edwin, age 60, died 26th August 1940
HOLMAN, C.A., age --, died 31st May 1942
HOPPER, Herbert Charles, age 53, died 9th April 1943
HOPPER, Millicent, age 53, died 9th April 1943
HOWLAND, Elsie Elizabeth, age 36, died 8th July 1940
IBBETT, Vivienne Mary Linsday, age 22, died 15th Sept. 1944
JONES, Charles John Austen, age 33, died 29th May 1941
KENDALL, Martha Grace, age 60, died 14th September 1944
KNIGHT, George Edward, age 79, died 26th August 1940
KNOTT, Betsy May, age 24, died 29th May 1941
KNOTT, Colin John, age 18 months, died 29th May 1941
LAKER, Margaret Carnegie Murrish, age 37, died 5th May 1942
LAWSON, Alice Emily, age 63, died 3rd July 1944
LUCKETT, Charles William, age 44, died 18th November 1940
LUCKETT, Maud Martha, age 47, died 18th November 1940
MARSH, Florence Elizabeth, age 25, died 29th May 1941
MASKELL, William, age 71, died 18th November 1940
MEANEY, Thomas, age 70, died 21st April 1944
MOCKETT, Daisy Anne, age 47, died 10th September 1944
MOCKETT, Margaret Susannah, age 80, died 12th Sept. 1944
MOORE, Albert John, age 49, died 5th October 1940
MURTON, Esther Hannah, age 63, died 3rd July 1944
PACKER, Amelia Eleanor, age 52, died 14th September 1944
PALMER, Frederick Davis, age 65, died 24th May 1944
PALMER, Mary Ann, age 70, died 24th May 1944
PEGDEN, Derek John, age 22 months, died 25th September 1943
PEGDEN, Jeanne Sylvia, age 10, died 25th September 1943
PEPPER, Thomas, age 57, died 24th September 1942
PITCHER, Alice, age 61, died 29th May 1941
PITCHER, Harry, age 64, died 29th May 1941
POTTEN, Arthur Edward, age 43, died 5th October 1940
PRINCE, Gerald William, age 17, died 6th October 1940
PUNYER, Henry Thomas, age 53, died 28th August 1940
RAINSFORD, Charles Vincent, age 62, died 18th November 1940
RAINSFORD, Rose Lucie, age 56, died 18th November 1940
RANSLEY, Cecil Albert, age 37, died 6th November 1941
RELEN, Albert John, age 61, died 23rd September 1944
SAUNDERS, George Edward, age 29, died 18th November 1940
SAYER, Ernest, age 67, died 5th April 1943
SCOTT, Frederick, age 83, died 5th April 1943
SIMMS, Charles William, age 30, died 6th October 1944
SIMPSON, Charlotte Martha, age 66, died 13th September 1944
SIMPSON, Robert, age 54, died 9th November 1942
SINSTADT, James William, age 36, died 29th May 1941
SINSTADT, Winifred Harriett, age 36, died 29th May 1941
STROUD, William Charles Frederick, age 76, died 5th Sept. 1944
STUBBINGTON, Charles, age 40, died 18th November 1940
TAME, Walter Tom, age 86, died 18th November 1940
TANNER, Vera, age 27, died 6th October 1940
TAYLOR, Charlotte Eveline, age 71, died 7th January 1941
TAYLOR, Grace Elizabeth, age 59, died 6th October 1940
THOMPSON, Harriet May, age 66, died 17th May 1942
TERRY, A.J., age --, died -- July 1940
TODD, Anne Ethel May, age 19, died 26th August 1940
UNWIN, William James, age 36, died 5th October 1940
WARNER, William George, age 40, died 23rd September 1942
WATKIN-EDWARDS, Rowland, age 63, died 17th May 1942
WEATHERHEAD, Fred Snr. age 67, died 4th January 1940
WEATHERHEAD, Fred Jnr. age 41, died 4th January 1940
WHITE, L.W.P., age --, died ---- 1942
WHITE, Sheila Esther, age 9, died 6th September 1940
WILLIS, Percy, age 61, died 9th April 1943
WOOD, Mary Harvey, age 84, died 15th August 1944

This can be found in Sandgate, where Cotter lived.
Folkestone being bombed in 1940
A rare photograph showing bombs hitting the water right in front of the lifts.
This is all that remained of Stokes Greengrocers, Tontine Street, after the Great Air Raid, Friday May 25th, 1917.  Owner Mr. William Henry Stokes and his 14 year old son, William Edmund Stokes were both killed, along with many other people - almost 60 in Tontine Street alone, plus many others died later of their injuries.  There is a comprehensive account of this tragedy HERE
2005 and the anniversary of VE Day.  Celebrations were taking place right across the country, and Folkestone was no exception.  It was looking very patriotic up on The Bayle, where a street party took place.  This photo was sent to me by Karen Rennie, who owns Rennies Seaside Modern  in The Old High Street. Her husband Paul is getting into the mood of the occasion by sporting a Victory V pin.
Shorncliffe Camp 1880
This wonderful photograph sent to me by Brian McBride shows the Harbour Canteen, that was the last friendly place our troops visited before leaving for the front.  The book seen on the table was filled with autographs of the servicemen.  This book, and another like it is still in existence, but I am not sure where.  I don't think it is available for the public to see.  The photograph was dated 1914 - 1919.
Here are those soldiers marching on their way to the harbour.  Stopping off at the canteen before they leave.
The 3rd Hussars riding along Guildhall Street in 1914, given an honourary send off by the Folkestone Council dignitaries.
A photograph from a newspaper of prisoners being escorted up the Road of Remembrance.  On the left you can see Swiss Cottage.  This is the write-up underneath it.  Were they really mostly reservists?  I don't know.

MARCHED UNDER ARMED GUARD: GERMAN RESERVISTS ARRESTED AT FOLKESTONE WHEN ABOUT TO EMBARK FOR FLUSHING.

A scene of excitement was witnessed at Folkestone Harbour when over two hundred German Reservists were stopped from embarking on the Flushing boat.  They were marched to Shorncliffe under an armed escort, their baggage following in motor-cars.  A statement issued by the Home Secretary on August 10, states that "a considerable number of Germans, chiefly reservists, have been arrested in various parts of the country.  This has been done as a precautionary measure and in accordance with what is usual in the early stages of a war, but it is not likely that the detention of most of the prisoners will be prolonged....The great majority of Germans remaining in this country are peaceful and innocent persons from whom no danger is to be feared".
The above photo was taken on the corner of Sandgate Road and Guildhall Street.  You can see the Queen's Hotel in the background, which stood where Bonmarché is now.
This photo of the cairn at the top of the Road of Remembrance was sent to me by Michael Brennan.
All the years I lived there, I never noticed this!  It is a bunker, I think left from WW2, and is situated down the Road of Remembrance.  Mark Cadier kindly gave me permission to reproduce his photo of it here.  I also believe there are tunnels leading from it underground.
Taken from Shorncliffe Camp in 1916, and sent to me by Stephen Ratcliffe
I am not sure if this photo belongs on the Military page, however, the YMCA were involved during the war operating rest camps, so it seems reasonable to me that they would have provided a 'Reading/Writing' service for the servicemen who needed it.
But if anyone has any more information on this, I would gladly receive it.
I have no information on this one, but would guess it to be somewhere on the Hythe ranges, which are still in use for the same type of purpose.
Folkestone marked the 25th Anniversary of the Battle of Britain in 1965 by planting this wonderful floral display.
'MAY THEIR DEEDS BE HELD IN REVERENCE'
                      Indeed!
During the war, most of the school-age children were evacuated to safer places than 'hell fire corner'.  Peter Campbell was one of those evacuees, and has kindly given me permission to add this link, which gives his account of what it was like to be sent from Folkestone to Merthyr Tydfil in Wales without your parents.  You can read his article HERE

Peter would love to hear from any of the friends he made while in Wales.  You will find his e-mail address in the Guestbook below.
These were Canadians marching along the Leas during WW1.
Sir Phillip Sassoon presenting a WW1 tank to the Mayor of Hythe on July 11, 1919 outside the White Hart Hotel.  Now it couldn't have been left there, because the White Hart is located at 71 High Street, and there just wouldn't have been room.  However, I have a feeling it was in the Red Lion Square for a while, but where it is now, I have no idea, any more than I know where the tank is from The Durlocks in Folkestone.  Incidentally, the White Hart has recently been reopened after refurbishment.  This is a relief, because it has been there since 1395, and the outside facade has been there since the 17th century.  They still have some of the original features of the pub, so why not drop by and take a look.
Taken from the Illustrated London News, these were the Easter Monday Volunteer Manoevres capturing Caeamp in 1890.
Note the viaduct in the background.  Not a pleasant day for it by the looks of it.
The canteen, No. 3 Restcamp
Another one of Napier Barracks and Military Road, Shorncliffe Camp in 1915.
Here we have the Royal Scots Regiment in 1906.  Don't you love their tartan trousers?
This engraving from the Illustrated London News depicts Queen Victoria reviewing the troops at Shorncliffe Camp in 1855
Aha!  This answers the question about where the WW1 tank was placed following the presentation to the Mayor of Hythe.  This is The Grove in Hythe, and you can see it over on the right of the picture.
A thousand thanks to Alan Sharp, who kindly took this photo March 8, 2012 of Risborough Lines.  Wow!  What a difference.  He tells me that the houses you can see are still army houses, but none of the buildings in the left photo are there now.  I wonder why the hills in the background look smaller?  Has to be an illusion, hills don't shrink do they?
I had a message in my Guestbook from someone called Christine, who was looking for information on her half-sister Kathleen Patricia Donogue who was killed in Cheriton by a grenade at the end of January in 1944, and isn't listed on the roll of civilian casualties.

Mark Hourahane researched and found information on this incident in the Folkestone Herald archives, and has kindly passed it along to me.  He is willing to send a copy of the archives to Christine if she cares to get in touch, as she left no contact address.  Here is Mark's summary of the article.

'The story is a sad one, unfortunately.  The accident was in Ashley Avenue and yes, it was an accident, not a direct result of wartime action, hence why Christine  couldn't find her on the civilian casualties list.  I think she may have been ever so slightly off as it happened at the beginning of February - and it wasn't a grenade.
A group of children (mostly boys), not including Kathleen, went for a walk in the hills "by way of Quested's brickyard" on Sunday (I think that's the 30 January 1944) afternoon.  (N.B. what's Quested's brickyard?  I live on what was some sort of brickwork - there's Tile Kiln Lane just up the road as a connection - would it be something related to that?)  One boy found an object in some bushes and took it.  They hid it in an alleyway.  The following day, they retrieved the object and asked some boys on Somerset Road, where David and Kathleen lived, what it was.  They told them it was a mortar bomb.  They hid it in his garage then went to school.
After school, David retrieved the mortar and went to play.  He took it to a friend's house in Ashley Avenue.  A relative (older brother?) was in the shed with a friend, and they told him to take it outside, knowing what it was.  They saw him bounce it off a slab of concrete twice.  The older boys ran, and the bomb went off.  They turned to see David pulling himself along the ground.  A policeman arrived to find David bleeding and unconscious, then found Kathleen, I think in the kitchen (it's a little unclear).  She was already dead.
The coroner recorded a verdict of accidental death - her heart had been punctured.  David, his sister and two children who lived at the address were injured.  David had compound fractures in both legs and was suffering from shock.  He had to have a foot amputated.
Kathleen's mother said she had seen her a little before 5pm (the accident happened shortly before 5), and had not realized she was going out to play.  Her husband was a sergeant in the army and had died sometime during the then-present war.  Kathleen also had a twin brother.'

That certainly is a sad story Mark, thank you for sharing it.  I hope Christine gets in touch, or reads this page to resolve the question for her.  Mark has posted his e-mail address into the Guestbook for her.

Update:  Christine has been in touch again and tells us that the other injured childred were:  Albert Kirkham, David and Marion Wise, Stanley and Marina Kirkham and Keith Norris. The house where the tragedy occurred  was 69 Ashley Avenue, and belonged to the Kirkhams.
1929 or 30